Plantation Row Slave Cabin Cooking:
The Roots of Soul Food

by Patricia B. Mitchell

Plantation Row Slave Cabin Cooking

Former slaves' first-hand accounts, many collected as part of the Federal Writers Project during the late 1930's, provide the foundation for a discussion of foods from slavery days. Published 1998. 23 recipes, 109 research notes, 37 pages. 5.5 x 8.5 inches. Soft cover, saddle-stitched. ISBN-10: 0-925117-89-7. ISBN-13: 978-0-925117-89-2.


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About the Book

In Plantation Row Slave Cabin Cooking Patricia B. Mitchell explores the topic of slave food on Southern plantations. She also touches on the overall lifestyle of slaves, briefly discussing housing, amusements, religion, and clothing.

The superior talent of black cooks is lauded. Whether making humble dishes in the slave cabin, or elegant fare for the mansion table, dark-skinned cooks welded the “kitchen scepter” with skill and creativity. Recipes for such fare as “Hog Maw Salad,” “Limping Susan,” “Plantation Shortcake,” and “Molasses Taffy” pepper the book. — “De eats wuz good…” as Aron Carter remembered. Such “eats” are “The Roots of Soul Food.”

109 endnotes will assist those who wish to learn more about the subject, and the first-person accounts in the text will be remembered and even read out loud to others.

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